Monday, 29. September 2014 in
New Delhi

Gender and Economic Policy Discussion Forum XIV:

Launch of Book ‘Aadhar: Gender, Identity and Development’

Date, Time
Monday, 29. September 2014, 3:00 pm
Organizer
Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung, Büro Indien
Part of the series
Gender and Economic Policy Discussion Forum

Aadhar: Gender, Identity and Development

Govind Kelkar, Dev Nathan, E. Revathi,  Swati Sain Gupta

In 2006, the Government of India intoduced Aadhar, a biometric identification system which has now reached 650 million people. The aim of the scheme is to establish a biometric registry to provide a unique identity to all individuals, women and men in the country. It is expected that the biometric identity would help poor women and men establish their identity so as to access various benefits provided by the Government.  In conjunction with legally engineered mini ATMs, it is also expected to promote financial inclusion.

The book looks at the gender dimension of Aadhar, studying the (current and potential) impact of the scheme especially on women and gender relationships within the household and on challenging patriarchal social norms. This volume explores whether Aadhar would help poor women establish their identity and through that, secure their entitlements due to various schemes of the Government.

The book analyses the need both for identity as well as women’s autonomous identity and agency. It then uses the field investigations from Jharkhand and Andhra Pradesh to look at the efficiency of its service providers as well as service receivers while focusing on issues of identity, equality and empowerment as well as how to improve women’s capabilities with identity and access to technology.

In 2006, the Government of India intoduced Aadhar, a biometric identification system which has now reached 650 million people. The aim of the scheme is to establish a biometric registry to provide a unique identity to all individuals, women and men in the country. It is expected that the biometric identity would help poor women and men establish their identity so as to access various benefits provided by the Government.  In conjunction with legally engineered mini ATMs, it is also expected to promote financial inclusion.

The book looks at the gender dimension of Aadhar, studying the (current and potential) impact of the scheme especially on women and gender relationships within the household and on challenging patriarchal social norms. This volume explores whether Aadhar would help poor women establish their identity and through that, secure their entitlements due to various schemes of the Government.

The book analyses the need both for identity as well as women’s autonomous identity and agency. It then uses the field investigations from Jharkhand and Andhra Pradesh to look at the efficiency of its service providers as well as service receivers while focusing on issues of identity, equality and empowerment as well as how to improve women’s capabilities with identity and access to technology.